From the Buddha’s Dhammapada (ByronKatie.com)

 

 

From the Buddha’s Dhammapada (ByronKatie.com).

(freely translated by Stephen Mitchell)

Mind creates the world;
what you see arises with your thoughts.
If you speak and act with a confused mind,
trouble will follow you as certainly
as a cart follows the ox that pulls it.

Mind creates the world;
what you see arises with your thoughts.
If you speak and act with a clear mind,
happiness will follow you as certainly
as your own shadow in sunlight.

“It’s his fault.” “She shouldn’t have done that.”
Believe such thoughts, and you live in resentment.

“It’s his fault.” “She shouldn’t have done that.”
Question such thoughts, and you live in freedom.

Anger teaches anger.
Fear results in more fear.
Only understanding can lead to peace.
This is the ancient law.

The Traveler’s Gift, Christian Book Review

Reading and reviewing books has become a past time. A few friends have joined in partnership to exchange text for examination. We have dissimilar religious and spiritual affiliations, they being Christians and the blogger a pious orphan. Taoism is the nearest philosophy among my external counsel.  However religious and philosophical membership aside, reading wisdom-based fiction is cool. Discovering new and useful information among text is the purpose anyhow.

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“The Traveler’s Gift” by Andy Andrews speaks about the fictional life of David Ponder. Mr. Ponders experience a midlife crisis and finds himself traveling back through time. He encounters several individuals who will provide him with values for personal success, seven total. Hence, however, these persons are making crucial decisions as David crashes into their bookspast.

In fact, Harry S. Truman found time to speak with David as he decided the fate of Japan. The past realities and David’s life come together to forge a new mental framework for guidance to success. Overall these seven principles are foundational attributes through a Christian writer’s lens.

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Personal Observation: Christian’ books (my personal book reviews) consistently promote “when my ship comes in” paradigms. The Traveler’s Gift in step presents a map to obtain future happiness and rewards. As such Mr. Andrews illustrate that present moments are only platforms for things to come.

The Traveler’s Gift, pp..88-89 My hopes, my passion, my vision for the future are my existenceI am passionate about my vision for the future. My course has been charted. My destiny is assuredI have a decided heart.”…pp 166,I will persist without exception. I focus on results. To achieve the results I desire, it is not necessary that I enjoy the process. It is only important that I continue the process with my eyes on the outcome…my light, my harbor, my future is within sight.”

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Sadly, we do not control the future with our works; however the author seems to suggest otherwise. In fact, he points out that until goals, ambitions, or expectations become reality happiness may remain dormant. This book in my opinion is a pep rally, a motivational dialogue woven into a brilliant story.

Nevertheless, disowning the present moment while concentrating exclusively on expectations will create pain for many.  Because obsessions with future or past events may create emotional trauma.  In addition, what happens when our plans do not work out? Do we blame God? On the other hand, do we condemn ourselves for a lack of faith?

In closing, adhere to the present in my humble opinion.  Because happiness is a state of being available anytime; your choice and free of charge.

Miles Davis

The Invisible Dragon

Daily Dragon’s Mantra…”Inner Peace”

The Search for Peace

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Peace is elusive to the seeker whose eyes are open. In this condition trees are rigid, rivers remain unsettle, and clouds maintain their downpour. Egotistical schemas sequester the temporary world in this infested perception. As a result the self-centered mind cannot erect a path to silence. However the mind of imagery must receive a pardon to begin the journey. Tranquility is within, the travel requiring limited supplies; an internal map carved by experiences is all one needs. Peace desires nothing, possess nothing, it is being nothing. The awareness to accept yourself is the stillness we seek.

The Invisible Dragon

Miles Davis

Does this make sense?

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Sequestered in a small space (The Free Mind), a megalomania examination of “Inner-Being” provoked an epochal deliberation of critical inner reflection. In the past, however, the descent into (The Suffering Mind) normally involved ameliorating negative thoughts or regrets…however; this expedition was as aforementioned in (The Free Mind).  As such, the often-adrenalized ego remained aloof and docile.  Hence, the latent absence permitted an excursion intended on freedom from within; to travel unmolested…make sense?

In addition, to remain congruent to the new (Free Mind) this inspection considered the practice of pontificating theories of intra-forgiveness. Although, popular maxims consider ‘one should forgive and forget others’ (Inter-forgiveness), this by the way; deserve an ambitious moratorium on the phraseology of ‘speech forgiveness.’

In fact, (Imitation verbal conviction aside), to exile pain caused by other’s mischief or unintentional consequences deserves lengthy praise…albeit, whenever truly accomplished…I am sorry, I digress.

To the point at hand…How does the pardon of self-inflicted injury heal?

***Book Recommendation Alert***

There’s No Such Place As Far Away” by Richard Bach

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The Invisible Dragon

Miles Davis

360 Tao, entry 37 ‘Discord’

Being constant in touch with Tao is an ideal…we can also fall out of synchronization with Tao through our own follies, as when we act without complete consideration…if we keep our patience, we can usually ride out these times.  We should take action and break the stagnation if an opportunity presents itself.  Whether it is waiting or acting, we should always try to bring a situation back into balance so that we can rejoin Tao…365 Tao Daily Meditation, Deng Ming-Dao

(Personal Development)

To develop higher awareness we must comprehend our spirit in its entirety.  To fully explore without pretentious covering or egotistical dishonesty, we must accept our present state of consciousness.  Consequently, the acceptance of our beliefs, habits, and consciousness may permit a spiritual baseline to enhance or otherwise.  Conversely, we may return to the Tao without hesitation or disharmony if we ventures dangerously close to the sun or deep-sea.  One cannot return to balance unaware of the curved consciousness.

The Invisible Dragon